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Vol. 12, No. 44 Week of November 04, 2007
Providing coverage of Alaska and northern Canada's oil and gas industry

PETROLEUM DIRECTORY: Crowley makes strides to address crewing shortages

Crowley has hired 21 seniors from the 2007 spring graduating classes of the nation’s merchant marine academies.  The surge in academy new hires is part of Crowley’s re-energized recruiting program designed to help address crewing shortages currently facing the maritime industry. 

These newly hired graduates will be given a comprehensive, training program intended to provide them an introduction to the basics of towing along with insight into Crowley’s procedures and safety culture. 

After the new-hires complete the training program, they sail for approximately one month under the guidance of Crowley’s experienced senior officers with an overall goal of exposing them to an environment where they gain hands-on tools for success and advancement of their skills.

Crowley is taking steps to further the company’s competitive advantage to not only recruit but also retain qualified seagoing personnel for the future. The company’s scholarship offerings to cadets at maritime academies have increased by nearly 60 percent.

In addition to focusing on academy graduates, Crowley has implemented a development program designed to help long-time employees advance their careers. In the summer of 2006, funding was approved to sponsor six of the company’s able-bodied seamen as they endeavored to pursue their 1600-Ton Mate’s license. 

“This program gives our experienced crew members the chance to climb the ladder when before they may have been limited by the financial loss incurred by enrolling in the licensing classes,” said Gilliam. 

In the future, Crowley has plans to develop a trainee engineer and chief mate program, which will provide crew members with the assistance and experience they need in order to make the jump to chief engineer or chief mate and eventually captain. 

“The current industry demographics are such that there will be lots of opportunity for advancement in the years to come, and Crowley is working hard to make sure these opportunities go to the individuals that most deserve them,” said Gilliam.



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